Development at
Different Ages

Developmental milestones represent a series of activities and behaviors at different ages that are considered to be typical for infants and children from birth to age six. However, every child is different and it is important to remember that the developmental milestones are just guidelines.

A healthy child may occasionally reach a milestone earlier or later than “average.” The list of milestones is broken down by age to provide the approximate time that one can expect a child to develop these skills, and ways to help a child learn and grow.

If you have any concerns about your child’s development, contact your child’s doctor, or one of these numbers:
If you suspect a developmental delay and your child is younger than three years old call First Steps at 859/815-1095.

If your child is age three or older, call Boone County Schools at 859/334-4455 or Walton-Verona Schools at 859/485-4181.

Sources for the Development Milestones:
Ages & Stages Questionnaires: A Parent-Completed, Child-Monitoring System, copyright 1995 by Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., by Diane Bricker, Jane Squires, and Linda Mounts, with assistance from LaWanda Potter, Robert Nickel, and Jane Farrell.

Child Development Web, www.childdevelopmentweb.com; Michael J. Gonsalves, Founder, Web Designer, Programmer and Author. Former supervisor of client coordination and service coordinator for The New York City Early Intervention Program. Also a former assistant psychologist, vocational rehabilitative counselor, vocational trainer and an assistant teacher for children and adults with special needs. Keith Gill, Founder, Author and Sales Representative. Service Coordinator, The New York City Early Intervention Program. Also formerly employed as a vocational rehabilitative counselor, vocational trainer and assistant teacher for children and adults with special needs.

BrainWonders Web site, www.zerotothree.org. Copyright 2001 Boston University School of Medicine, Erikson Institute, and ZERO TO THREE.

National Network for Child Care - NNCC. Part of CYFERNET, the National Extension Service Children Youth and Family Educational Research Network. Reprinted with permission from National Network for Child Care - NNCC. Oesterreich, L. (1995). Ages & stages - four-year-olds. In L. Oesterreich, B. Holt, & S. Karas, Iowa family child care handbook [Pm 1541] (pp. 204-207). Ames, IA: Iowa State University Extension. 

Disclaimer:
All materials provided by Success By 6 are for information purposes only and do not constitute medical or psychological advice. The authors and publishers and/or their respective suppliers make no representations about the suitability of the information for any purpose. Information is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. The authors and publishers and/or their respective suppliers hereby disclaim all warranties and conditions with regard to this information. In no event shall the authors and publishers and/or their respective suppliers be liable for any special, indirect or consequential damages or any damages whatsoever resulting from the use or performance of this information.