Development at
2 Years

What Your Child Should Be Doing

  • Points with index finger.
  • Walks up or down one or two stairs without help.
  • Walks, runs, climbs, kicks a large ball.
  • Speaks between 20 to 50 words, and uses two word sentences like “See dog”.
  • If asked, “where’s your nose, ears, feet, etc.,” points to seven body parts correctly.
  • Turns pages of a book.
  • Points to correct picture when asked “where’s the ___?”
  • Stacks three to seven blocks.
  • After watching you demonstrate, draws a single line on paper, in any direction.
  • Scribbles with crayons and smears finger paints.
  • Follows simple verbal directions without visual cues.  Ex: “hold my hand.”
  • “Pretends” that objects are something else. Ex: talks into TV remote like it’s a phone.
  • Hugs, pretends to feed or care for dolls, stuffed animals, etc.
  • Refers to self by name, or “me” or “I”.
  • Finds hidden object by looking in several places.
  • Has trouble sharing, controlling temper.
  • Asserts independence.  Ex: “No, me do it!”
  • Is easily frustrated; sometimes has tantrums when tired, hungry, or upset.
  • Forms strong attachments to parent(s), caregivers. May have separation anxiety.
  • Asks for food and drink when hungry or thirsty.
  • May demonstrate strong likes or dislikes for different foods, but changes mind quickly.
  • Drinks from a cup and sets it down with only a little spilling.
  • Brings spoon to mouth, turns spoon over.
  • Eats with fingers.
  • Seems to eat very little at any one time.
  • Likes music, rhythmic movements and sounds


How You Can Help

  • Take walks and stop to examine interesting things the child sees along the way.
  • Provide a variety of toys that can be pushed, pulled, and propelled with the feet.
  • Provide things to fill, dump, or stack.
  • Provide plenty of safe, low places for climbing under, over, inside, and around.
  • Read to him.  Let him turn pages and point to pictures.
  • “Pretend” play with her, ex: pretend to have a telephone conversation.
  • Let him play with pots, pans, wooden spoons.
  • Describe to her what you are doing.
  • Name people, places and things.
  • Foster creativity by providing large paper, crayons, and finger-paints.
  • Ask him questions about what he is doing.
  • Play hide-and-seek, peek-a-boo.
  • Praise accomplishments and good behavior.
  • State clear consequences for behavior.
  • Change negative behavior by demonstrating the positive behavior you want, or redirecting child to another activity.
  • Become familiar with cues that she is tired or hungry.
  • Avoid frustrating or over-stimulating activities at those times.
  • Don’t expect children this age to share.
  • Provide enough toys for all.
  • Help him handle frustration and anger with words, rather than physical aggression.
  • Develop a comforting good-bye ritual. 
  • Allow her to have a security toy or blanket.
  • Offer a variety of foods. After a time, reintroduce foods previously refused.
  • Offer food in bite-sized pieces to eat with her fingers, for hand-eye coordination.
  • Feed several small meals and healthy snacks each day.